Family Recipe Friday · Maternal · Prompts

Family Recipe Friday: Orator F. Woodward, Jell-O Magnate

I found another interesting tidbit of history from my mom’s side of the family. My 1st cousin 5x removed, Orator Francis Woodward bought the Jello-O name and business from a neighbor for $450 in 1899! Though not the inventor of the product, he began producing Jell-O through his Genesee Pure Foods Company.

Side of a Jell-O shipping crate, from the Smithsonian National Museum of American History

Back to the beginning though. Orator F. Woodward was the son of Abner T. Woodward and Phebe Lyman. Phebe was the sister of my 4x great-grandfather Levi Lyman. Levi’s daughter Mary married Andrew L. Moore, one of the Moore boys that moved west from New York in the 1860s.

Phebe Lyman was born on Sept. 1, 1820 in LeRoy, New York and married Abner T. Woodward on Nov. 18, 1843. Between 1845 and 1859, they had 4 sons and 2 daughters. Orator was born July 26, 1856 in Bergen, New York. His father, Abner, enlisted in the Civil War on Sept. 1, 1864. He was a private in the 8th New York Heavy Artillery, Company G. He was at the Battle of Hatcher’s Run and died at City Point, Virginia on January 24, 1865 of sickness. He was buried at the City Point National Cemetery.

Buffalo (NY) Evening News, June 4, 1894, page 22

In the 1870 census, Phebe was living in LeRoy with Orator, aged 14, and Clara, aged 10. Her brother Seth Lyman was living there as well. According to the 1875 New York State Census, they were living in a framed house valued at $1500 (Seth had died in 1871). In 1880, Phebe (54), Orator (23), Clara (20), and Clara’s husband, Thomas Larkin (20) were still living in LeRoy.

Orator F. Woodward
Cora L. Talmage Woodward

In 1882, Orator married Cora L. Talmage. They had six children: Ernest Leroy (b. Oct. 20, 1882), Orator Frank (b. May 26, 1884), Paul Wilbur (b. Dec. 31, 1886), Eleanore (b. Jun. 13, 1889), Donald (b. Dec. 20, 1893), and Helen (b. Jun. 19, 1899).

In the 1870s, he began inventing and manufacturing vaious remedies. In 1895 in LeRoy, Pearle B. Wait and his wife May created “Jell-O” by adding fruit syrups to gelatin. In 1899, he sold the formula and name to Orator for $450. He built up the business through very popular advertising campaigns. Unfortunately, Orator died on January 21, 1906. He had suffered a stroke the year before and, weeks before his death, had gone to Hot Springs, Arkansas for his health. His wife Cora became president of the Genesee Pure Foods Company. Their son Ernest succeeded her. Ernest had married Edith Hartwell in 1903. They had one son named Talmage Woodward.

There are lots of newspaper articles out there detailing the exploits of the Woodward family and the Jell-O company. In 2018, Allie Rowbottom published a memoir of her family titled Jell-O Girls: A Family History. Allie’s great-grandmother was Edith Hartwell’s sister.

Other links:
Woodward Memorial Library – http://www.woodwardmemoriallibrary.org/family.php
The History of Jell-O – https://www.jellogallery.org/history.html

52 Ancestors · Maternal · Prompts

#32 Andrew Moore (1830-1918)

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Photo by Anne Sears (www.findagrave.com)

Andrew Lowell Moore is one of my great-great-great grandfathers. He was born February 13, 1830 to John and Clarissa (Sparks) Moore in Mt. Washington, Massachusetts, which is located in the southwest corner of the state. In the 1850 U.S. Census, the family was living in Batavia, Genesee, New York (about 40 miles east of Buffalo). John was aged 59 and a farmer with $4000 in real estate. His wife Clarissa was 55. There oldest child was also named Clarissa and was 22. Andrew was 20, while George was 17. The youngest daughter was named Sabra Ann and was 12. All were born in Massachusetts, except John who was born in New York. John and Clarissa also had 6 older children, already out of the house, named Abigail, Betsey, Benjamin, Michael, Louisa, and John.

Andrew married Mary J. Lyman in Stafford, Genesee, New York on September 6, 1855. In 1860, Andrew, Mary, and their 11-month-old son Lee were living in Pembroke, Genesee County. Andrew was a farmer.

By 1870, the family had moved to Little Rock, Kendall, Illinois. Andrew was now a druggist with a personal estate of $1500. Lee was 10 years old. They had a son Fred (my great-great grandfather) who was 7 and had been born in Michigan. They also had a daughter Cora Libbie who was 7 months old.

In 1880, Andrew, Mary, and their youngest daughter Mary Frances, 2 years old, were boarders at widow Eliza Haines home in Plymouth, Michigan. Andrew was a general store keeper. Lee was back in Plano, Kendall, Illinois as a store clerk, while Fred was living in Stafford back in New York with his maternal grandmother Sarah. Cora had died in August 1870. I wonder why the family was spread across the country? It is interesting to note that Fred married my great-great grandmother in Plymouth, Michigan in 1885, so somehow he ended up there.

In 1900, Andrew, Mary and Mary “Mae” Frances were living in Sandwich, De Kalb, Illinois along with a boarder named Francis Newton. Andrew was a druggist and Francis was a drug salesman. Mae and Francis eventually married.

Andrew’s wife, Mary, died on March 31, 1904 and was buried in Oak Ridge Cemetery in Sandwich. In 1910, Andrew was living with his daughter Mae and her husband Francis who now was a proprietor of a drug store. He died at the age of 88 on October 3, 1918 and was buried next to his wife.

moore_will
Andrew L. Moore’s Will (Illinois, Wills and Probate Records, 1772-1999. Ancestry.com. 2015. Provo, UT, USA)

52 Ancestors #32 – One of 32 3rd Great Grandparents